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Billy Bragg has attracted a lot of criticism since his article in the Guardian….

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/jul/31/south-bank-skateboarders-wrong-veto-community

but what do people expect from him. The developers from the Southbank have wheeled him out in attempt to convince old activists that the common good must prevail, and the common good is youth and arts – how can one object to that. The fact it’s in the Guardian shows what type of person he is appealing to (what I the demographic of the Guardian readership and do they all live in Brighton), Bragg like the Guardian lives on the reputation that it used to have, but now just represents the middle England that Tony Blair was so passionate about.

The skateboarders have got them on the run, muscling together any credibility that might sway support for the skate park. Skateboarding has always been associated with radicalism, whether clothing, music or attitude, which most skateboarders I have known protect their culture vehemently. (If you don’t skate don’t wear the fucking clothes). The skate park is part on a non sterile London and it is essential it is preserved, not just for the skaters but to stop gentrification. I’m sure if developers and business had their way everywhere would be exactly the same – minimum effort, maximum profit.

I’m fat and forty but still can appreciate where I would be rather be when I was younger – listening to Billy Bragg with 500 buskers or watching skaters amaze people with ability you wouldn’t believe you could have with a board and wheels.

I’m sure if there was a Banksy painting in there people, the people wanting to redevelop the area would be campaigning to keep it open. I’m fat and forty but still can appreciate where I would be rather be when I was younger – listening to Billy Bragg with 500 buskers or watching skaters amaze people with ability you wouldn’t believe you could have with a board and wheels.

 

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